Legacy of War: Suspicious Device Washed up on Northern Ireland Beach

What appears to be an second world war bomb has washed up at a beach near Cushendun GAA club in Co. Antrim. The device was discovered on Sunday evening by a member of the public who then contacted the Ballycastle Coastguard.

MATT STEELE/MCAULEY MULTIMEDIA. 16TH OCTOBER 2016. Ballycastle coastguard have been tasked to the coast 100 meters north of Cushendun GAC to deal with what appears to be a war time or more recent explosive device. It is expected that the area will be secured until daylight when a Army technical officer will examine the scene the operation is now underway the decision on daylight examination has yet to be made. PIC MATT STEELE/MCAULEY MULTIMEDIA

Explosive Antique Cylindrical device found on Cushendun Beach. Image: Matt Steel/ McCauley Multimedia

The surrounding area was sealed off and during a search of the area by the Coastguard a second device was found. The first object is cylindrical in shape and it is not yet known whether it is an old WW2 bomb or a more recent device. The area has been kept secure until this morning when Army technicians can examine and secure the objects.

MATT STEELE/MCAULEY MULTIMEDIA. 16TH OCTOBER 2016. Ballycastle coastguard have been tasked to the coast 100 meters north of Cushendun GAC to deal with what appears to be a war time or more recent explosive device. It is expected that the area will be secured until daylight when a Army technical officer will examine the scene the operation is now underway the decision on daylight examination has yet to be made. PIC MATT STEELE/MCAULEY MULTIMEDIA

Ballycastle Coastguard Discoverd a second device during search. Image: Matt Steel/ McCauley Multimedia

Since the end of the First World War the UK’s Ministry of Defence has dumped more than a million tons of munitions in Beaufort’s Dyke, a sea trench between Northern Ireland and Scotland. Mortar bombs, mines, anti-aircraft shells, grenades, cluster bombs and more have been dumped there up until 1973 when this type of dumping became illegal. Occasionally some of these materials wash up on shore.

About the Author

Ann Robinson

Has a passion for coastal heritage and maritime history. Loves sharing the best of the Irish coast online. Contact me ann@coastmonkey.ie or follow me on Twitter @AnnRobinson22